Walorski Votes for National Concealed Carry Reciprocity

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Walorski Votes for National Concealed Carry Reciprocity

House Passes Bill to Allow Concealed Carry Across State Lines, Strengthen Background Checks

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today voted to allow law-abiding gun owners with a concealed carry permit to exercise their rights when traveling across state lines.

“Americans don’t lose their Second Amendment rights when they cross state lines, and they shouldn’t lose their concealed carry rights either,” Congresswoman Walorski said. “The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act will protect the rights of law-abiding gun owners and allow those qualified to carry a concealed firearm to do so in any state that allows it.”

BACKGROUND

State laws and regulations have created a confusing patchwork of reciprocity agreements for concealed carry permit holders. The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act (H.R. 38), which passed the House by a vote of 231 to 198, would allow any law-abiding gun owner with a valid, state-issued concealed carry permit to carry a concealed firearm in any state that allows concealed carry.

Each state would still determine its permitting requirements, and individuals would have to abide by state local concealed carry laws. Nothing in the bill would change who is eligible to possess a firearm, and it would exclude anyone who is prohibited by federal law from owning or carrying a gun.

H.R. 38 also includes a bipartisan measure to help law enforcement prevent dangerous criminals from obtaining firearms. Based on the bipartisan, bicameral Fix the NICS Act (H.R. 4477), these provisions would strengthen the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) by ensuring federal and state authorities report criminal history records to NICS as existing law requires.

The bill would penalize federal agencies that fail to report relevant criminal records, incentivizes states to improve reporting, and directs federal funds to ensure domestic violence records are accurately reported. It would also require the Bureau of Justice Statistics to report to Congress whether current criminal penalties already cover the use of bump-fire stocks to commit violent crimes.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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