Category: In The News

Walorski Statement on FY2022 Appropriations

Walorski Statement on FY2022 Appropriations

Exclusion of Hyde Amendment Protections Will Cost Lives, Endanger Americans’ Conscience Rights

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) released the following statement on H.R. 4502, the FY2022 appropriations package.

“As a responsible steward of taxpayer dollars, I have many concerns with the Democrat-led appropriations bills. This reckless spending will further exacerbate the ongoing inflation crisis, while failing to address our nation’s real security and defense needs,” Congresswoman Walorski said. “Disappointingly, this legislation also excluded vital pro-life protections, including the Hyde Amendment. This longstanding provision has prevented taxpayer funding for abortion services since 1976, saving nearly 2.5 million lives. No American should be forced to bankroll abortion against their conscience, and I will continue to defend the sanctity of life and our fundamental rights.”

BACKGROUND

Congresswoman Walorski is a steadfast advocate for the dignity of life. This week, she spoke in opposition to the exclusion of both the Hyde Amendment and the Helms Amendment, which prohibits taxpayer support for abortion abroad. Watch her full remarks on the Hyde Amendment and the Helms Amendment.

 

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee and the Ranking Member of the House Ethics Committee.

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Walorski Op-Ed in The Washington Examiner: The Dignity of Work Uplifts Families

Walorski Op-Ed in The Washington Examiner: The Dignity of Work Uplifts Families

“Incentivizing work and eliminating barriers is proven to uplift families from poverty to prosperity.”

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.), Ranking Member of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Worker and Family Support, this week outlined Republicans’ plan to uplift struggling families from poverty to prosperity through pro-work, pro-growth reforms.

In the Washington Examiner, Congresswoman Walorski addressed the underlying barriers to work and highlighted the importance of helping individuals find and keep family-sustaining jobs.

Washington Examiner
The dignity of work uplifts families
Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.)
July 27, 2021

Our nation has been built and forged by generations of hardworking people. Since our country’s founding, the dignity of work has been vital to our culture and to the American dream itself.

Time and time again, meaningful jobs and work have been the key to ending the cycle of poverty and lifting struggling families into success. As we mark the 25th anniversary of welfare reform this summer, we must reaffirm our commitment to supporting our neighbors in need, strengthening the workforce, and growing our economy.

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In 1996, Congress passed landmark bipartisan welfare reform, which included the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program. These block grants were designed to empower states to end open-ended entitlement and provide a temporary safety net for those in need. Since then, some states have manipulated the program and outright ignored its work requirements. A quarter of a century later, we have the opportunity to return that program to its intended purpose — addressing the underlying barriers to work and equipping families to succeed.

We can’t keep throwing money at the problem. No number of endless government payments can address the challenges that could be holding a family back from success, which could include addiction, abuse, or unaddressed mental health issues. While Democrats want to keep paying people to stay home, Republicans are putting forth pro-work, pro-growth solutions that help individuals find and keep family-sustaining jobs.

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Incentivizing work and eliminating barriers is proven to uplift families from poverty to prosperity. By reforming welfare for the first time in the 21st century, we can take commonsense action today to secure tomorrow’s success. Restoring the dignity of work will not only strengthen our national fabric but also will unlock the American dream for families now and for generations to come.

Read Congresswoman Walorski’s full op-ed HERE.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee and the Ranking Member of the House Ethics Committee. She is the Ranking Member of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Worker and Family Support.

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Walorski Statement on CDC Mask Guidance

Walorski Statement on CDC Mask Guidance

Mask Mandates Undercut Faith in Facts, American Innovation

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) released the following statement on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) announcement on updated mask guidance.

“Reinstituting mask mandates sends the wrong signal,” Congresswoman Walorski said. “The CDC’s updated mask guidance will undercut Americans’ faith in facts and innovation, and I will continue to oppose all federal mask mandates.”

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee and the Ranking Member of the House Ethics Committee.

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Walorski Introduces Motorsports Fairness and Permanency Act

Walorski Introduces Motorsports Fairness and Permanency Act

Bipartisan Legislation Would Eliminate Burdens, Provide Tax Certainty for Motorsports Industry

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today introduced bipartisan legislation, the Motorsports Fairness and Permanency Act of 2021, to make permanent the seven-year cost recovery period for motorsports entertainment complexes. This commonsense solution would provide certainty and equip industry leaders to make long-term investments in safe racing environments.

“As Hoosiers know firsthand, the motorsports industry supports a beloved American pastime and creates family-sustaining jobs in our community,” Congresswoman Walorski said. “This commonsense legislation will provide long-term certainty to facilities like the Indianapolis Motor Speedway – home of the Indy 500 – so they can continue to invest in our communities, create good jobs, and drive economic growth across the country.”

BACKGROUND
Congresswoman Walorski introduced this bipartisan legislation alongside Reps. Mike Thompson (D-Calif.), Bill Posey (R-Fla.), Terri Sewell (D-Ala.), Tom Reed (R-N.Y.), and Stephanie Murphy (D-Fla.).

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee and the Ranking Member of the House Ethics Committee.

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Walorski Op-Ed in The Hill: Blanket Tariff Proposal Could Jeopardize Recent Economic Boom

Walorski Op-Ed in The Hill: Blanket Tariff Proposal Could Jeopardize Recent Economic Boom

“Trump is right to take action … but across-the-board tariffs will harm American manufacturers, workers, and consumers.”

Congresswoman Jackie Walorski

The Hill
Blanket tariff proposal could jeopardize recent economic boom
By Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.)
March 8, 2018

Since President Trump took office, he and Congress have worked together to strengthen our economy, protect American workers, and put our country on a stronger path.

Thanks to his leadership, we passed historic tax cuts and rolled back the Obama administration’s most burdensome regulations. Now our economy is growing, businesses are expanding, workers are seeing more money in their paychecks, and America is back ahead of our global competitors.

However, the president’s recent proposal to impose blanket tariffs on aluminum and steel imports threatens to undercut this economic boom and cost good-paying American jobs.

President Trump is right to take action against unfairly traded aluminum and steel from countries like China, but across-the-board tariffs will harm American manufacturers, workers, and consumers while letting China off the hook.

Read the full op-ed here.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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In The News: Elkhart Truth: Women elected to office see opportunities to serve

Congresswoman Jackie Walorski

Women elected to office see opportunities to serve

Statistics show about 20 percent of Congress is female

By Paige Mallory Passman

According to the United States Department of Labor, the most common occupation for women are elementary and middle school teachers, registered nurses, secretaries and administrative assistants, nursing, psychiatric and home health aides. That only leaves 87.3 percent for women who are paralegal and legal assistants, according to the United States Department of Labor. Only 1 in 5 are elected to government office.

One of those is Jackie Walorski, United States Representative for Indiana’s second district. She is one of 106 women and one of only 27 Republicans to hold seats in Congress, according to the Center for Women and Politics. The House of Representatives has 84 Congresswomen and the US Senate has 22 female senators. That calculates to about 20 percent for both the House and the Senate.

“I think that my focus is the reason why I ran to begin with. I’m a fighter, bringing mountains down that are in front of people. I am grateful to be a member of Congress,” she said.

Walorski said she is grateful and she looks forward to the challenges every day of being able to improve the lives and the quality of life for the people in the second district.

“I think it’s difficult for women to get traction or be managing their family, and look around and figure out how they are going to make a difference, but I think women make great fighters, and so I think that the future for women is wide open and brighter than it’s ever been,” said Walorski.

Read the full story here.

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In The News: Ripon Advance: Republican-led House oversight subcommittee, House colleagues urge IRS reform

Congresswoman Jackie Walorski

Republican-led House oversight subcommittee, House colleagues urge IRS reform

Republican members of the U.S. House Ways and Means Oversight Subcommittee and House colleagues with bills to support the cause, this week outlined their essential reforms for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

During the subcommittee’s Jan. 30 Member Day Hearing, entitled “Legislation to Improve Tax Administration,” House lawmakers chastised the IRS for ongoing budget blunders, outdated and subsequently improperly updated technology, and customer service failures that have left American taxpayers scoffing with distrust.

“I know the relationship between the IRS and taxpayers can be strained, particularly as taxpayers try to understand their tax liability and the IRS struggles to communicate and provide help,” said U.S. Rep. Lynn Jenkins (R-KS), the new subcommittee chairman and a CPA, who said she wants to restore the relationship between the two.

That’s not going to be easy, according to subcommittee member U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-IN), who said a trust gap exists between American taxpayers and the IRS. “It didn’t open up overnight and it won’t be closed overnight either,” Walorski said, “but we absolutely have to fix it.”

… In explaining how the trust gap came to be, Walorski provided examples from the U.S. Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA), which conducted a 2017 report that found the IRS essentially purchased an incorrect software product for a project it ended up pausing due to a lack of funds and staff. Another TIGTA report found the IRS wasted $12 million on an email system that turned out to be one it couldn’t use, Walorski said. Again, TIGTA found that the IRS bought it first without determining project infrastructure needs nor other technological feasibilities, the congresswoman said.

“There is a clear, critical and urgent need for the IRS to fundamentally overhaul its IT systems, but repeated mistakes, big and small, undermine our trust that they’ll get it right,” said Walorski, who called for more accountability, better contracting practices, and an established strategic vision that includes long-range planning.

Some of the reforms can be legislative, Walorski said, but some of it is a cultural shift that’s going to be up to the next IRS commissioner to handle and, “I hope it will be a priority.”

Read the full story here.

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In The News: WISH: Lawmakers ask for renewal of opioid public health emergency declaration

Congresswoman Jackie Walorski

Lawmakers ask for renewal of opioid public health emergency declaration

By Brittany Lewis

Indiana senators and representatives are asking President Trump to renew the opioid public health emergency declaration. It’s set to expire on Tuesday, Jan. 23.

Back in October, President Trump asked the Department of Health and Human Services to declare the opioid crisis a public health emergency, allowing the government to accelerate temporary appointments of people

… According to a spokesperson for Rep. Jackie Walorski, she signed onto a letter being sent Saturday urging the president to renew the emergency declaration and to work with Congress to advance additional funding to address the opioid crisis.

In a statement to 24 Hour News 8 she said:

The epidemic of opioid abuse is taking lives, destroying families, and devastating communities across the country. The president was right to declare a public health emergency, and I believe this declaration must be renewed so we can continue working on solutions. I am committed to working with my colleagues, the administration, and state and local leaders to ensure our communities have the tools and resources needed to end this crisis.

Read the full story here.

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In The News: Journal Gazette: Bipartisan push to kill medical device tax

Congresswoman Jackie Walorski

Bipartisan push to kill medical device tax

By Brian Francisco

Congressional efforts to kill the newly reinstated medical device tax are ramping up.

A short-term federal spending plan proposed this week by House Republican leaders would suspend the 2.3 percent sales tax for two years, retroactive to Jan. 1. Congress has until Saturday to extend spending or risk a government shutdown.

Meantime, Massachusetts’ Democratic senators have introduced legislation that would eliminate the tax.

“Until we have a bill that’s voted on and signed, we’re anxious,” Anne Hathaway, executive director of the Indiana Medical Device Manufacturers Council, said Wednesday in a telephone interview.

“Any repeal at this point is good for our members and our industry,” Hathaway said about prospects for the tax delay, adding that the council will continue to advocate for a permanent repeal.

Indiana is home to at least 16,000 medical device industry jobs, many of them at orthopedic implant producers in and around Warsaw.

The House proposal to delay the tax “is recognition that innovators should never have to make another payment as a result of this disastrous policy again,” Mark Leahey, president and chief executive officer of the Medical Device Manufacturers Association, said Wednesday in a statement.

The tax was imposed on device manufacturer sales in 2013 to help fund the Affordable Care Act, which created a subsidized insurance marketplace for Americans who lack access to employer-provided coverage. The Republican-controlled Congress suspended the tax for 2016-17 but allowed it to take effect again this year.

Lawmakers from Indiana have been vocal opponents of the tax, contending it hinders job growth and medical innovation. Rep. Jim Banks, R-3rd, said Wednesday that his “top legislative priorities” include eliminating the tax.

“While I support a full repeal of this misguided tax, a two-year delay will make a significant difference for Hoosier device manufacturers and workers,” Banks said in a statement.

Rep. Jackie Walorski, R-2nd, said in a statement that a tax suspension “will provide relief to local manufacturers and protect Hoosier workers. … I look forward to voting for this bill and getting back to work to end the medical device tax once and for all.”

Read the full story here.

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In The News: Ripon Advance: Walorski secures fair IRS treatment for military retirees

Congresswoman Jackie Walorski

Walorski secures fair IRS treatment for military retirees

U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-IN) has successfully convinced the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to treat military retirees as fairly as it treats other retirees when collecting unpaid taxes.

“All Americans have an obligation to pay the taxes they owe, but those who risked their lives for our country should be treated fairly and equally by the IRS,” said Rep. Walorski, who serves on the House Ways and Means Committee, which has jurisdiction over taxation matters.

IRS Acting Commissioner David J. Kautter wrote in a Jan. 12 letter to Walorski that the IRS plans to implement her requested change to the Federal Payment Levy Program (FPLP), which recovers unpaid taxes via automated levies on taxpayers who receive certain payments from the federal government. Generally, taxpayers with incomes below 250 percent of the federal poverty level are excluded from the program’s automatic levies, according to Walorski’s office, but in 2017 the IRS changed the FPLP and didn’t apply that criteria to military retirees.

In her Nov. 17, 2017 letter to Kautter, the congresswoman requested that the IRS use its so-called low-income filter for military retirement payments so that retirees would be spared undue economic hardship. Walorski pointed out in the letter that the practice would conform with how the IRS currently handles other federal retirement benefit payments. Using the low-income filter means a taxpayer won’t be left with too little money for living expenses after a levy triggers the automatic fund collection.

… “I am pleased the IRS has decided to protect low-income military retirees — many of whom spent decades serving in uniform — from unnecessary economic hardship,” said Rep. Walorski.

Read the full story here.

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