Issue: Economy and Jobs

Walorski Statement on Strong Economic Report

Walorski Statement on Strong Economic Report

Economy Grew 4.1% in 2nd Quarter, Highest Rate of GDP Growth in Nearly Four Years

MISHAWAKA, Ind. – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today released the following statement on the strong economic report showing 4.1 percent growth of gross domestic product (GDP) in the second quarter of 2018:

“Today’s strong economic report is the latest sign the American economy is booming. Historic tax cuts and regulatory reforms have put our country on a stronger path, and we need to keep this momentum going. That’s why I’ll continue fighting for Hoosier workers, farmers, manufacturers, and small businesses so hardworking families have the opportunity to achieve the American Dream.”

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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Walorski: Tariff Exclusion Process Is Broken

Walorski: Tariff Exclusion Process Is Broken

U.S. Manufacturers Testify at Ways and Means Hearing on Problems Plaguing Exclusion Process for Steel and Aluminum Tariffs

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today at a Ways and Means Trade Subcommittee hearing renewed calls for the Commerce Department to fix the broken exclusion process for steel and aluminum tariffs.

“The current exclusion process is broken – it’s opaque, unfair, and breathtakingly inconsistent,” Congresswoman Walorski said. “We’re not asking Commerce to grant every request. We’re saying there are major structural issues that are causing uneven outcomes. We’re saying that the deck seems to be stacked toward one side right now and it needs to be rebalanced.”

Walorski highlighted problems encountered by U.S. manufacturers in all three phases of the process: posting, objections, and decisions. In May, Walorski led a bipartisan letter signed by 39 members of Congress asking Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to implement 10 commonsense changes to the exclusion process.

Posting

Businesses granted product exclusions are eligible for reimbursement of tariffs paid, but relief is retroactive to the date of posting for public comment rather than the date of the request.

According to data available on Regulations.gov and compiled by Walorski’s office, applications are posted an average of 3-4 weeks after they are submitted. Such delays are made worse when companies are forced to re-submit applications due to unclear guidelines or inconsistent rejections for minor errors.

Todd Adams, president of Sanitube LLC and vice president of Stainless Imports, Inc., testified that his company was forced to pay tariffs on a one-time order of imported steel. Although the shipments were initiated before Section 232 tariffs took effect, the company is ineligible for retroactive relief on two shipping containers of steel that arrived after the exclusion request was submitted but before it was posted. The company is still awaiting a decision on one of its applications.

Objections

Exclusion requests are posted for a 30-day public comment period, but there is no process in place to allow businesses to rebut objections.

Out of more than 5,700 objections submitted in response to steel and aluminum exclusion requests, only 54 were posted before the end of the comment period, leaving businesses no opportunity to respond. Some were told they had to re-submit their request – starting the process over – in order to make a rebuttal.

Willie Chiang, executive vice president, COO, and director of Plains All American Pipeline, testified that several objections to his company’s exclusion request were submitted on the last day of the 30-day comment period and were posted a week after it closed. The exclusion request was denied.

Decisions

The Commerce Department has made decisions on approximately 1,100 exclusion requests but is providing no explanation for its approvals or denials.

The department provides one of two reasons for denying a request: there is sufficient quantity and quality of domestic supply, or the application was incomplete. However, it does not provide an explanation or disclose its analysis. Demonstrating the lack of transparency in the decision process, Commerce has denied seven exclusion requests on the basis of sufficient supply even though there were no objections submitted.

One Commerce official predicted this opaque an inconsistent process in June, telling the Washington Post: “It’s going to be so unbelievably random, and some companies are going to get screwed.”

Video of Congresswoman Walorski’s comments at the hearing is available here.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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Walorski Votes to Repeal Job-Killing Medical Device Tax

Walorski Votes to Repeal Job-Killing Medical Device Tax

House Passes Permanent Repeal of Tax That Puts Hoosier Jobs and Innovation at Risk

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today voted to repeal the job-killing medical device tax and protect Hoosier jobs in the innovative medical device manufacturing industry.

“Our economy is booming because of historic tax cuts and regulatory reforms, and we need to keep that momentum going,” Congresswoman Walorski said. “It’s time to end the medical device tax once and for all. Permanently repealing this job-killing tax will protect Hoosier workers and help patients access the life-saving medical technology they need.”

The House passed H.R. 184, the Protect Medical Innovation Act, which would permanently repeal the 2.3 percent excise tax on medical device sales, by a vote of 283 to 132. Congress earlier this year suspended the tax through 2019. Walorski in December introduced H.R. 4617, which would have suspended the medical device tax for five years.

Video of Walorski speaking on the House floor in support of H.R. 184 is available here. The full text of her remarks is below.

“Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I rise today in support of H.R. 184, the Protect Medical Innovation Act.

“This legislation will permanently repeal the job-killing medical device tax. Hoosiers are proud to be leaders in medical innovation, with more than 300 medical device manufacturers in our state that support nearly 55,000 jobs. These are high-paying jobs, with workers in the industry earning about $50,000 per year on average.

“However, after Obamacare’s medical device tax took effect, the industry lost almost 29,000 good-paying jobs nationwide from 2012 to 2015, according to Commerce Department data. That’s why Congress took bipartisan action in 2015 to suspend the tax for two years, and did so again earlier this year. But if it goes back into effect after 2019, it will impede new discoveries and stifle medical innovation while destroying good jobs.

“Right now, our economy is booming because of historic tax cuts and regulatory reforms, and we need to keep that momentum going. It’s time to end the medical device tax once and for all. Permanently repealing this job-killing tax will protect American workers and help patients access the life-saving medical technology they need.

“Mr. Speaker, the medical device tax would have a devastating impact on Hoosier workers and people from across the country who depend on these products. The Protect Medical Innovation Act will boost American innovation and manufacturing, and it will encourage medical research and development that make a real difference in people’s lives. I urge my colleagues to support this vital piece of legislation, and I yield back.”

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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Walorski Leads Bipartisan Letter Warning Against Auto Tariffs

Walorski Leads Bipartisan Letter Warning Against Auto Tariffs

149 Members of Congress Urge Secretary Ross Not to Put American Jobs, Economic Growth at Risk

WASHINGTON – A bipartisan group of 149 members of Congress today called on Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross not to put American jobs and economic growth at risk by imposing tariffs on automobiles and automotive parts.

In a letter led by U.S. Reps. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.), Terri Sewell (D-Ala.), Mike Kelly (R-Pa.), and Ron Kind (D-Wis.), the members highlighted the economic benefits of the auto industry and warned of negative consequences if the ongoing Section 232 national security investigation into imports of automobiles and automotive parts results in tariffs, quotas, or other restrictions.

“We support the Department of Commerce as it seeks a level playing field for our manufacturers and workers in the global marketplace and penalizes bad actors,” the members wrote. “We do not believe that imports of automobiles and automotive parts pose a national security threat. Rather, we believe the imposition of trade restrictions on these products could undermine our economic security.”

A signed copy of the letter is available here, and the full text is below.

Wednesday, July 17, 2018

The Honorable Wilbur Ross
Secretary
Department of Commerce
1401 Constitution Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20230

Dear Secretary Ross:

We support your efforts to ensure a fair and level playing field with our trading partners, and we agree with you that the manufacturing base, particularly the automotive and automotive supplier industry, is important to the economic security of the United States. However, we are concerned that the recently announced Section 232 national security investigation into imports of automobiles and automotive parts could have a significant negative impact on the economic security of our country.

Our nation’s automotive industry is a critical driver of the American economy, historically contributing between 3.0-3.5% of our total GDP. It depends on a vast and complex network of suppliers to build vehicles, a large dealer network to sell them, and a substantial retail and aftermarket industry to supply repair and replacement parts – establishing facilities and creating jobs in every state.  The industry has rebounded from the depths of the Great Recession, and in some parts of the industry, employment is actually higher than pre-recession levels. However, imposing tariffs, quotas, or other restrictions on automobiles and/or automotive parts threatens to undo that momentum.

We urge you to keep the following factors at the top of your mind as you conduct your investigation and develop recommendations:

  • Quality, high-paying jobs are at stake in every state that span the industry: suppliers, dealers, and automakers; research and development, design, and manufacturing; installation and maintenance;
  • Innovative, advanced technology work, including research and development and manufacturing of high-value, highly technical components, is conducted here in the U.S.;
  • Close trading partners, many of which are our allies and valuable export markets for vehicles and parts manufactured in the U.S., are planning retaliation against our vulnerable industries;
  • Suppliers, automakers, and dealers have planned considerable investments in innovation, expansion, workforce training, and job growth;
  • The industry is facing price increases and supply challenges due to other trade actions;
  • Price increases from tariffs, quotas, and other trade restrictions will ultimately be borne by American families in the form of higher vehicle prices, delayed purchases, and foregone vehicle maintenance, among others; and
  • Unintended consequences will hurt other industries that rely on products that could be subject to trade restrictions, including used automobiles, heavy-duty vehicles, military vehicles, RVs, heavy machines and construction equipment, vintage and antique automobiles, and other vehicles.

We support the Department of Commerce as it seeks a level playing field for our manufacturers and workers in the global marketplace and penalizes bad actors. We believe, however, that the taxpayer dollars being used by the Commerce Department for this investigation would be better spent on other endeavors. We do not believe that imports of automobiles and automotive parts pose a national security threat. Rather, we believe the imposition of trade restrictions on these products could undermine our economic security.

Sincerely,

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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Walorski Votes for 2018 Farm Bill

Walorski Votes for 2018 Farm Bill

Agriculture and Nutrition Act Protects Crop Insurance, Reduces Regulatory Burdens, Promotes Ag Exports, Strengthens SNAP

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today supported House passage of the Agriculture and Nutrition Act (H.R. 2), also known as the 2018 Farm Bill, which would provide long-term certainty for Hoosier farmers and strengthen the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

“Farmers are the backbone of America, and we depend on them to keep safe, nutritious, and affordable food on our tables,” Congresswoman Walorski said. “The Farm Bill boosts protections for our family farmers, promotes ag exports, and cuts red tape so local farm operations can grow and thrive. It also strengthens SNAP so people who fall on hard times have a better chance to build a bridge out of poverty and achieve the American Dream. This vital legislation builds on the positive impact tax cuts are having for farmers, businesses, workers, and families across Indiana. I look forward to working with my colleagues in the Senate to send final legislation to President Trump for his signature.”

BACKGROUND

Walorski last year sent a letter to House Agriculture Chairman Mike Conaway outlining Hoosier priorities for the 2018 Farm Bill based on feedback she received from farmers in the 2nd District. Many of the priorities Walorski advocated were included in H.R. 2, which passed the House by a vote of 213 to 211.

  • Protect Crop Insurance: The Agriculture and Nutrition Act preserves this crucial backstop for farmers and ranchers and strengthens the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) options.
  • Reduce Regulatory Hurdles: Unnecessary and duplicative bureaucratic rules put great burdens on farmers and ranchers. The 2018 Farm Bill streamlines regulations and reduces red tape.
  • Promote Agriculture Exports: Exports are as important as ever for Hoosier farmers at a time of low commodity prices and falling farm incomes. This legislation authorizes funding for vital tools for trade promotion and market development. It also allows the Secretary of Agriculture to provide assistance to farmers affected by unfair foreign trade practices.
  • Support Voluntary Conservation Efforts: Indiana is a national leader in voluntary conservation programs, the Farm Bill will allow Hoosiers to continue to innovate and lead with tailored solutions to local issues. H.R. 2 folds the best features of the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) into the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP).
  • Prepare for Disease Outbreaks: The Farm Bill continues to invest in and improve research, preparedness, mitigation, detection, and response to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), foot and mouth disease (FMD), and other diseases. It establishes the National Animal Disease Preparedness and Response Program, establishes a new U.S.-only vaccine bank, and enhances the National Animal Health Laboratory Network.
  • Invest in Rural Broadband: Our lives are becoming increasingly digital, and farm operations are no different. Unfortunately, internet speeds in rural America greatly lag behind urban and suburban areas. The Agriculture and Nutrition Act will help bridge this gap by investing in rural broadband and requiring USDA to establish forward-looking broadband standards.
  • Strengthen SNAP: Congresswoman Walorski worked to comprehensively examine SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, in the 114th Congress when she chaired the Nutrition Subcommittee of the House Agriculture Committee. Dozens of hearings have shown that SNAP is a crucial part of the safety net, that the program works, and that there are improvements that can be made. The Agriculture and Nutrition Act strengthens and streamlines SNAP and its Employment & Training (E&T) programs to better help individuals build a bridge out of poverty.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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Walorski Statement on Tariffs on Chinese Imports

Walorski Statement on Tariffs on Chinese Imports

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today released the following statement after President Trump approved tariffs on certain goods imported from China:

“President Trump is right to confront China’s unfair trade practices that stifle innovation and cost American jobs, but I am concerned these tariffs will harm our manufacturers, farmers, and workers. Any action must be narrowly targeted and balanced to avoid slowing the tremendous economic growth we’re seeing because of tax cuts and regulatory reforms.

“The administration must also implement a strong and fair exclusion process. It is critical that the mistakes of the Commerce Department – which has failed to provide transparency and due process to American businesses impacted by steel and aluminum tariffs – not be repeated.”

BACKGROUND

Congresswoman Walorski has led calls for improvements to the product exclusion process established by the Department of Commerce for Section 232 steel and aluminum tariffs in order to reduce burdens on manufacturers and other small businesses. She sent a bipartisan letter signed by 38 of her colleagues asking Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to implement changes to streamline the process and provide certainty and relief to small businesses impacted by the tariffs.

After Walorski led 15 of her Ways and Means colleagues in sending a letter to Secretary Ross urging retroactive relief for companies that successfully petition for product exclusions from the tariffs, President Trump signed an order ensuring tariffs paid while a product exclusion request is pending will be returned if the exclusion is granted.

At a recent House Ways and Means Committee hearing, Walorski pressed U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer on the administration’s response to threats of retaliatory tariffs that could harm American farmers, manufacturers, and other small businesses. She called on the administration to consider the impact retaliatory measures could have on small businesses and family farmers in Indiana.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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Walorski Statement on Administration Decision on Steel and Aluminum Tariffs

Walorski Statement on Administration Decision on Steel and Aluminum Tariffs

MISHAWAKA, Ind. – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today released the following statement on the administration’s decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada, Mexico, and the European Union:

“Steel and aluminum tariffs are already doing serious harm to American businesses and workers, and this decision will only make matters worse.

“Imposing tariffs on our allies will do nothing to solve the problem of China’s unfair trade practices, but it will further raise costs for American manufacturers, hurt their global competitiveness, expose farmers to damaging retaliatory tariffs, and put American jobs at risk.

“The administration needs to work with Congress to fix the product exclusion process and find a more targeted, balanced solution that does not threaten to undo the economic momentum driven by tax cuts.”

BACKGROUND

Congresswoman Walorski recently called for improvements to the product exclusion process for steel and aluminum tariffs to reduce burdens on manufacturers and other small businesses. She led a bipartisan letter 38 of her colleagues asking Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to implement changes to streamline the process and provide certainty and relief to small businesses impacted by the tariffs.

After Walorski led 15 of her Ways and Means colleagues in sending a letter to Secretary Ross urging retroactive relief for companies that successfully petition for product exclusions from the tariffs, President Trump signed an order ensuring tariffs paid while a product exclusion request is pending will be returned if the exclusion is granted.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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Walorski Calls for Changes to Tariff Product Exclusion Process for Manufacturers

Walorski Calls for Changes to Tariff Product Exclusion Process for Manufacturers

Leads Bipartisan Letter to Secretary Ross Requesting Improvements to Provide Relief for Small Businesses

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today called for improvements to the product exclusion process for steel and aluminum tariffs to reduce burdens on manufacturers and other small businesses. In a bipartisan letter led by Walorski, 39 Members of Congress asked Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to implement changes to streamline the process and provide certainty and relief to small businesses impacted by the tariffs.

“We appreciate that, in response to Member and constituent requests, you have implemented a product exclusion process for the Section 232 steel and aluminum tariffs,” the Members wrote. “However, we are concerned that over a month after the process began, the review process is moving far too slowly and that it places a significant burden on manufacturers, especially small businesses. We write today to urge you to make needed changes to that process that would improve how it functions and provide relief to small businesses.”

A signed copy of the letter is available here, and the full text is below.

May 7, 2018

The Honorable Wilbur Ross
Secretary
Department of Commerce
1401 Constitution Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20230

Dear Secretary Ross,

We appreciate that, in response to Member and constituent requests, you have implemented a product exclusion process for the Section 232 steel and aluminum tariffs. However, we are concerned that over a month after the process began, the review process is moving far too slowly and that it places a significant burden on manufacturers, especially small businesses. We write today to urge you to make needed changes to that process that would improve how it functions and provide relief to small businesses.

The Department of Commerce announced the exclusion process on March 18, 2018 and began accepting applications a day later. Since then, thousands of applications have been filed. However, as of May 4, the Department has posted 1,572 steel and 129 aluminum applications. That is a far too slow of a pace given the volume and the fact that this process is over a month and a half old.

We were pleased that Department of Commerce responded to past Congressional suggestions, such as our request that Customs and Border Protection provide retroactive relief in the event of a positive product exclusion determination. It is abundantly clear, however, that more changes are needed. As such, we request that the Department:

  1. Provide relief to those experiencing undue delays in the application review period by extending relief retroactive to the date of submission if the application was considered complete on the date of submission, or to the date when requested information that rendered the application complete was submitted if Commerce had notified the applicant that additional information was needed;
  2. Allow exclusions covering ranges of certain dimensions with the same Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) code in order to clear up confusion surrounding the form, simplify the application process for manufacturers – some of whom we understand have had to split one request into as many as 30 separate requests because of this issue – prevent duplicative requests, and reduce the time it takes the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) to review and vet applications;
    • In particular, both the steel and aluminum forms contain contradictory and confusing requests. Section 2.j states that “ranges…are allowed.” However, section 3.b asks for “information on the single steel [or aluminum] product that is the subject of this Exclusion Request: 1) dimensional information for the single aluminum product and a single size – not a range of products or sizes…A separate Exclusion Request must be submitted for each steel [or aluminum] product by physical dimension.” Further adding to the confusion, section 3.b at the same time asks for the minimum and maximum of various specifications.
  3. Allow trade associations to apply for exclusions for an industry, again in order to save both manufacturers (particularly small businesses that otherwise might not be able to afford to apply) the time and money spent filing and BIS the time spent reviewing duplicative applications;
  4. Take measures to protect sensitive information and trade secrets, including proactively informing applicants about avenues to protect sensitive information and trade secrets and excluding unnecessary application requirements such as metallurgical composition;
  5. Provide timely information to companies requesting exclusions, including status and anticipated wait time, so they can plan;
  6. Publish an “FAQ” page clarifying the exclusion request process in plain language, including who must file, what should be included in supplemental materials, how to protect sensitive information and trade secrets, and differences with the separate proposed Section 301 tariffs, which we understand have caused confusion due to similar timing;
  7. Incorporate the concept of grandfathering existing contracts in evaluating exclusion applications in order to avoid undue disruption to the operations of U.S. companies that are already relying on qualified suppliers of needed inputs;
  8. Regularly review the impact of tariffs on the economy and downstream users and implement a plan to sunset them if they prove to have a significant negative impact;
  9. Consider the needs of U.S. manufacturers for custom-made and other specialized steel and aluminum inputs, many of which are not available from domestic producers and for which an advance application may be impractical due to one-off orders; and
  10. Authorize all companies granted product exclusions to import tariff-free from any source country unless it is proven to be unfairly traded, given that the basis of the exclusion request is that the U.S. company cannot source the product domestically.

We stand committed to working with you and the President to find a targeted approach that will reach our shared goals while avoiding lasting negative impacts. However, we believe that significant improvements to the exclusion process are still needed to prevent unnecessary duplication, reduce the burden on small businesses, and provide certainty and relief.

Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Sincerely,

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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Walorski Statement on Tariff Exemption Announcement

Walorski Statement on Tariff Exemption Announcement

Administration Extends Steel and Aluminum Tariff Exemptions for U.S. Trading Partners

MISHAWAKA, Ind. – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today released the following statement on the Trump administration’s decision to extend exemptions from the steel and aluminum tariffs for the European Union, Canada, and Mexico:

“President Trump’s decision to extend tariff exemptions for our trading partners is good news for our local manufacturers and their workers. I will continue working with the administration to protect Hoosier jobs by ensuring the tariffs are narrowly targeted and provide American businesses the flexibility and long-term certainty they need to grow.”

BACKGROUND

Congresswoman Walorski has worked to minimize the harmful impact of the steel and aluminum tariffs that recently took effect. After Walorski led 15 of her Ways and Means colleagues in sending a letter to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross urging retroactive relief for companies that successfully petition for product exclusions from the tariffs, President Trump signed an order ensuring tariffs paid while a product exclusion request is pending will be returned if the exclusion is granted.

Walorski also recently pressed U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer on the administration’s response to threats of retaliatory tariffs that could harm American farmers, manufacturers, and other small businesses. She called on the administration to consider the impact retaliatory measures could have on small businesses and family farmers in Indiana.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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Walorski Questions Labor Secretary on Solutions to the Jobs Gap

Walorski Questions Labor Secretary on Solutions to the Jobs Gap

Ways and Means Committee Continues Examination of Workforce Development Solutions

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today questioned Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta about efforts to measure outcomes in workforce development initiatives and ensure these programs are effective in helping people move up the economic ladder.

“I chaired the Nutrition Subcommittee for the Ag Committee in 2015 and 2016, and we conducted a comprehensive review of SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, over 16 hearings,” Congresswoman Walorski said. “One theme that stuck out is the idea of moving away from just counting the number served and focusing instead on outcomes. We can’t just stop at asking how many people received benefits. We need to go a step deeper: Did the recipient get and keep a job? Are they moving up the economic ladder? If not, what happened? We get a much more comprehensive picture from which we can evaluate the effectiveness of these programs.”

Video of Walorski questioning Acosta at today’s hearing is available here.

BACKGROUND

The hearing on “Jobs and Opportunity: Federal Perspectives on the Jobs Gap” was part of a series of hearings examining the gap between businesses’ demand for workers and the millions of Americans not in the labor force. The first hearing last week included testimony from a Hoosier boat manufacturer.

According to the Ways and Means Committee, 5.5 million Americans aged 16 to 24 – one in seven – are not working or in school, and an additional 7 million working-age men are not working or looking for work.

As chair of the Agriculture Committee’s Subcommittee on Nutrition in the 114th Congress, Walorski helped lead a two-year review of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). In a series of 16 hearings, the subcommittee and full committee examined the past, present, and future of the anti-hunger program to identify successes and areas in need of improvement.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

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