Issue: Economy and Jobs

Walorski Calls for Changes to Tariff Product Exclusion Process for Manufacturers

Walorski Calls for Changes to Tariff Product Exclusion Process for Manufacturers

Leads Bipartisan Letter to Secretary Ross Requesting Improvements to Provide Relief for Small Businesses

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today called for improvements to the product exclusion process for steel and aluminum tariffs to reduce burdens on manufacturers and other small businesses. In a bipartisan letter led by Walorski, 39 Members of Congress asked Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to implement changes to streamline the process and provide certainty and relief to small businesses impacted by the tariffs.

“We appreciate that, in response to Member and constituent requests, you have implemented a product exclusion process for the Section 232 steel and aluminum tariffs,” the Members wrote. “However, we are concerned that over a month after the process began, the review process is moving far too slowly and that it places a significant burden on manufacturers, especially small businesses. We write today to urge you to make needed changes to that process that would improve how it functions and provide relief to small businesses.”

A signed copy of the letter is available here, and the full text is below.

May 7, 2018

The Honorable Wilbur Ross
Secretary
Department of Commerce
1401 Constitution Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20230

Dear Secretary Ross,

We appreciate that, in response to Member and constituent requests, you have implemented a product exclusion process for the Section 232 steel and aluminum tariffs. However, we are concerned that over a month after the process began, the review process is moving far too slowly and that it places a significant burden on manufacturers, especially small businesses. We write today to urge you to make needed changes to that process that would improve how it functions and provide relief to small businesses.

The Department of Commerce announced the exclusion process on March 18, 2018 and began accepting applications a day later. Since then, thousands of applications have been filed. However, as of May 4, the Department has posted 1,572 steel and 129 aluminum applications. That is a far too slow of a pace given the volume and the fact that this process is over a month and a half old.

We were pleased that Department of Commerce responded to past Congressional suggestions, such as our request that Customs and Border Protection provide retroactive relief in the event of a positive product exclusion determination. It is abundantly clear, however, that more changes are needed. As such, we request that the Department:

  1. Provide relief to those experiencing undue delays in the application review period by extending relief retroactive to the date of submission if the application was considered complete on the date of submission, or to the date when requested information that rendered the application complete was submitted if Commerce had notified the applicant that additional information was needed;
  2. Allow exclusions covering ranges of certain dimensions with the same Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) code in order to clear up confusion surrounding the form, simplify the application process for manufacturers – some of whom we understand have had to split one request into as many as 30 separate requests because of this issue – prevent duplicative requests, and reduce the time it takes the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) to review and vet applications;
    • In particular, both the steel and aluminum forms contain contradictory and confusing requests. Section 2.j states that “ranges…are allowed.” However, section 3.b asks for “information on the single steel [or aluminum] product that is the subject of this Exclusion Request: 1) dimensional information for the single aluminum product and a single size – not a range of products or sizes…A separate Exclusion Request must be submitted for each steel [or aluminum] product by physical dimension.” Further adding to the confusion, section 3.b at the same time asks for the minimum and maximum of various specifications.
  3. Allow trade associations to apply for exclusions for an industry, again in order to save both manufacturers (particularly small businesses that otherwise might not be able to afford to apply) the time and money spent filing and BIS the time spent reviewing duplicative applications;
  4. Take measures to protect sensitive information and trade secrets, including proactively informing applicants about avenues to protect sensitive information and trade secrets and excluding unnecessary application requirements such as metallurgical composition;
  5. Provide timely information to companies requesting exclusions, including status and anticipated wait time, so they can plan;
  6. Publish an “FAQ” page clarifying the exclusion request process in plain language, including who must file, what should be included in supplemental materials, how to protect sensitive information and trade secrets, and differences with the separate proposed Section 301 tariffs, which we understand have caused confusion due to similar timing;
  7. Incorporate the concept of grandfathering existing contracts in evaluating exclusion applications in order to avoid undue disruption to the operations of U.S. companies that are already relying on qualified suppliers of needed inputs;
  8. Regularly review the impact of tariffs on the economy and downstream users and implement a plan to sunset them if they prove to have a significant negative impact;
  9. Consider the needs of U.S. manufacturers for custom-made and other specialized steel and aluminum inputs, many of which are not available from domestic producers and for which an advance application may be impractical due to one-off orders; and
  10. Authorize all companies granted product exclusions to import tariff-free from any source country unless it is proven to be unfairly traded, given that the basis of the exclusion request is that the U.S. company cannot source the product domestically.

We stand committed to working with you and the President to find a targeted approach that will reach our shared goals while avoiding lasting negative impacts. However, we believe that significant improvements to the exclusion process are still needed to prevent unnecessary duplication, reduce the burden on small businesses, and provide certainty and relief.

Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Sincerely,

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

###

Walorski Statement on Tariff Exemption Announcement

Walorski Statement on Tariff Exemption Announcement

Administration Extends Steel and Aluminum Tariff Exemptions for U.S. Trading Partners

MISHAWAKA, Ind. – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today released the following statement on the Trump administration’s decision to extend exemptions from the steel and aluminum tariffs for the European Union, Canada, and Mexico:

“President Trump’s decision to extend tariff exemptions for our trading partners is good news for our local manufacturers and their workers. I will continue working with the administration to protect Hoosier jobs by ensuring the tariffs are narrowly targeted and provide American businesses the flexibility and long-term certainty they need to grow.”

BACKGROUND

Congresswoman Walorski has worked to minimize the harmful impact of the steel and aluminum tariffs that recently took effect. After Walorski led 15 of her Ways and Means colleagues in sending a letter to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross urging retroactive relief for companies that successfully petition for product exclusions from the tariffs, President Trump signed an order ensuring tariffs paid while a product exclusion request is pending will be returned if the exclusion is granted.

Walorski also recently pressed U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer on the administration’s response to threats of retaliatory tariffs that could harm American farmers, manufacturers, and other small businesses. She called on the administration to consider the impact retaliatory measures could have on small businesses and family farmers in Indiana.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

###

Walorski Questions Labor Secretary on Solutions to the Jobs Gap

Walorski Questions Labor Secretary on Solutions to the Jobs Gap

Ways and Means Committee Continues Examination of Workforce Development Solutions

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today questioned Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta about efforts to measure outcomes in workforce development initiatives and ensure these programs are effective in helping people move up the economic ladder.

“I chaired the Nutrition Subcommittee for the Ag Committee in 2015 and 2016, and we conducted a comprehensive review of SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, over 16 hearings,” Congresswoman Walorski said. “One theme that stuck out is the idea of moving away from just counting the number served and focusing instead on outcomes. We can’t just stop at asking how many people received benefits. We need to go a step deeper: Did the recipient get and keep a job? Are they moving up the economic ladder? If not, what happened? We get a much more comprehensive picture from which we can evaluate the effectiveness of these programs.”

Video of Walorski questioning Acosta at today’s hearing is available here.

BACKGROUND

The hearing on “Jobs and Opportunity: Federal Perspectives on the Jobs Gap” was part of a series of hearings examining the gap between businesses’ demand for workers and the millions of Americans not in the labor force. The first hearing last week included testimony from a Hoosier boat manufacturer.

According to the Ways and Means Committee, 5.5 million Americans aged 16 to 24 – one in seven – are not working or in school, and an additional 7 million working-age men are not working or looking for work.

As chair of the Agriculture Committee’s Subcommittee on Nutrition in the 114th Congress, Walorski helped lead a two-year review of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). In a series of 16 hearings, the subcommittee and full committee examined the past, present, and future of the anti-hunger program to identify successes and areas in need of improvement.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

###

Walorski Marks Final Tax Day Under Broken Tax Code

Walorski Marks Final Tax Day Under Broken Tax Code

Hoosiers Will See Tax Cuts, Bigger Standard Deduction, Simplified Tax Code Next Year

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today released the following statement ahead of Tax Day, which this year falls on Tuesday, April 17th:

“No one looks forward to Tax Day, but this year there’s some good news: it’s the last time Americans will have to file their taxes under the old, broken tax code. Hardworking Hoosiers are already seeing the benefits of historic tax cuts, including bigger paychecks, more job opportunities, and a growing economy. And when Tax Day comes again next year, working families will be able to keep more of the money they earn and spend less time filing their taxes under a fairer, simpler tax code.”

BACKGROUND

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which was signed into law at the end of 2017, cut taxes for Americans at all income levels. When taxpayers file their 2018 taxes next year, they will do so under a simpler tax code with lower rates, a nearly-doubled standard deduction, and a doubled child tax credit. According to the Ways and Means Committee, the average middle-income family in Indiana’s 2nd District will see a tax cut of $1,979.

The House this week will consider several bipartisan bills to overhaul the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), including a measure introduced by Congresswoman Walorski to strengthen IRS accountability for modernizing its information technology (IT) systems.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

###

Walorski Discusses Jobs Gap with Hoosier Manufacturer at Ways and Means Hearing

Walorski Discusses Jobs Gap with Hoosier Manufacturer at Ways and Means Hearing

Local Business Smoker Craft Among Job Creators to Testify About Workforce Development Efforts

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today discussed challenges businesses and workers face due to the jobs gap at a hearing that included testimony from a local manufacturer. Peter Barrett of Smoker Craft, a boat manufacturer in New Paris with 690 employees, testified before the Ways and Means Human Resources Subcommittee about the need for skilled workers and efforts to get more Hoosiers into the workforce.

“For local manufacturers like Smoker Craft, business is booming, but the jobs gap continues to create challenges,” Congresswoman Walorski said after the hearing. “Businesses need more skilled workers, and too many Americans remain on the sidelines of our growing economy.  As we work to find commonsense solutions, I’m grateful Peter was here to testify about the need for workforce development so this family-owned business can continue to create good jobs for Hoosiers.”

“The concept of workforce training programs is vital to bridging the jobs gap we are facing today and in the future,” Barrett testified before the subcommittee. “Simply put, we need skilled workers. Our industry needs welders, riveters, assembly people, and truck drivers. Shop classes need to return, and exposure to careers in manufacturing through internships and apprenticeships should be encouraged. Careers in the trades need to be recognized and glorified. Our workforce is the backbone of this country. We need to support the expansion of career and technical education, or CTE, just as we support four-year and graduate education.”

Video of Barrett’s opening statement and Walorski’s questions is available here.

Rep. Jackie Walorski thanks Peter Barrett and his wife Christine after today’s hearing.

BACKGROUND

The hearing on “Jobs and Opportunity: Local Perspectives on the Jobs Gap” was the first in a series of hearings examining the gap between businesses’ demand for workers and the millions of Americans not in the labor force. According to the Ways and Means Committee, 5.5 million Americans aged 16 to 24 – one in seven – are not working or in school, and an additional 7 million working-age men are not working or looking for work.

Founded in 1903, Smoker Craft, Inc., is a fourth-generation family-owned and operated boat manufacturer. The company employs 690 workers and manufactures pontoon boats, fiberglass boats, and aluminum fishing boats under the brand names Smoker Craft, Starcraft, Sunchaser, and Sylvan. Peter Barrett is senior vice president of marketing and corporate development at Smoker Craft.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

###

Walorski Shares Feedback from Hoosier Businesses Impacted by Tariffs at Hearing

Walorski Shares Feedback from Hoosier Businesses Impacted by Tariffs at Hearing

Committee Examines Tariff Effects on U.S. Economy and Jobs

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today shared feedback from Hoosier businesses affected by steel and aluminum tariffs at a Ways and Means Committee hearing on the impact of tariffs on the U.S. economy and jobs.

“Historic tax cuts and regulatory reforms have revived America’s economy, but I am constantly hearing from businesses in northern Indiana that steel and aluminum tariffs are driving up costs and making it more difficult for them to grow and create jobs,” Congresswoman Walorski said after the hearing. “The administration has taken steps to narrow these tariffs to better target unfair trade, but more must be done to protect businesses and jobs here at home. I will continue listening to Hoosier manufacturers, farmers, and workers and making sure their voices are heard so we can keep our economic momentum going.”

Video of Walorski sharing local businesses’ feedback at the hearing is available here. She read the following quotes from Hoosier job creators in a wide range of industries:

  • “[We’ve seen] a 50% increase [in the price of steel], mostly since the tariffs were announced. Additionally…there is a shortage of steel. We are furloughing the production line in [one facility] today and will probably have to furlough some of the guys in [our main facility] later in the week due to lack of availability of material. We have raised prices to our customers but because [our product is] a low margin item – the combination of the increase and the lack of availability is affecting sales.”
  • “We cannot switch to a U.S. source…and it would take 1 to 2 years for us to get approval from our…customers if there was a U.S. source. We will continue to import steel…and will pay the duties…So far we have incurred about $15,000 in tariff costs with a potential of another $240,000 based upon the orders we have already booked with [our] Japanese steel supplier…We are moving forward with our Exclusion Requests…So far the cost has been close to 100 hours to complete these exemption forms along with some legal costs for review and advice.”
  • “We have rolling shortages of steel and we are on allocation [from our supplier in Utah]… Prices had already gone up 25% and 30% respectively [on aluminum and steel] because of speculation. Now we are seeing a trend past 30-35% each. Of course I am livid.”
  • “We observed steel prices starting to move up in early 2017 on just the talk of potential steel tariffs and a sharp escalation in steel prices in the last 3 months as the tariffs started to become a reality. This has resulted in a 15% to 29% increase in the cost of our steel. To put this in perspective, our increase in steel cost is larger than the entire cost of providing health insurance to our workforce.
  • “We are the sole manufacturer left in the United States that manufactures this type of product. Our competitors import all or most of their finished product from either Mexico, China, Vietnam, etc, therefore avoiding any impact of this tariff…The bottom line is this, if you raise our steel and aluminum prices, our prices will have to increase in order to cover the cost. Our foreign competitors will not be affected…We currently purchase all our steel and aluminum from domestic sources.”
  • “We are in the process of trying to build a 147,000 square foot warehouse…[The company building the warehouse] gets their steel from Canada, a country exempted from the steel tariff. However, we are unable to get a firm quote even out of Canada, because prices are beginning to rise there with so much demand shifted to Canada…It is not on hold, we have to build it so we are at the mercy of a volatile market.”
  • “When purchasing raw materials, we give preference to domestic steel mills wherever possible. We enjoy long outstanding relationships with many domestic mills. We want them to thrive…The actual dynamics of the entire metalworking market have evolved in the last 40 years…In some cases, we find that domestic mills cannot meet the quality standards required by our customers; or they cannot meet the quality standards at a competitive cost. In those cases, we will buy foreign material…Why put a tariff on these items?

BACKGROUND

Congresswoman Walorski has worked to minimize the harmful impact of the steel and aluminum tariffs that recently took effect. After Walorski led 15 of her Ways and Means colleagues in sending a letter to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross urging retroactive relief for companies that successfully petition for product exclusions from the tariffs, President Trump signed an order ensuring tariffs paid while a product exclusion request is pending will be returned if the exclusion is granted.

Walorski also recently pressed U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer on the administration’s response to threats of retaliatory tariffs that could harm American farmers, manufacturers, and other small businesses. She called on the administration to consider the impact retaliatory measures could have on small businesses and family farmers in Indiana.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

###

Walorski Urges President Trump to Remain in NAFTA, Modernize Agreement for 21st Century

Walorski Urges President Trump to Remain in NAFTA, Modernize Agreement for 21st Century

Republican Members of Congress Send Letter Reaffirming Economic Benefits of NAFTA

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) and dozens of her colleagues this week urged President Trump to build on the economic momentum spurred by tax cuts by remaining in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and modernizing the trade pact for the 21st century.

“The effort you have led to modernize the agreement for the 21st century is incredibly important and, in combination with the historic tax cuts that you signed last year, has the potential to unleash the American economy unlike any other time before,” wrote Walorski and 63 of her House colleagues in a letter to the president. “We can further improve economic opportunities for American consumers, workers, and job creators by remaining in NAFTA and modernizing the agreement. We look forward to working with you and your Administration to realize our shared goal of a modernized NAFTA that will foster even greater economic success for Americans as we continue to compete and win around the world.”

The letter, led by Walorski and Reps. Pete Sessions (R-Texas), Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.), and Mimi Walters (R-Calif.), was signed by 64 Republican members of the House of Representatives.

A signed copy of the letter is available here, and the full text is below.

The Honorable Donald J. Trump
President of the United States
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20500

Dear President Trump,

We write today to reaffirm the benefits of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The effort you have led to modernize the agreement for the 21st century is incredibly important and, in combination with the historic tax cuts that you signed last year, has the potential to unleash the American economy unlike any other time before.

NAFTA provides the foundation for a strong North American economy that will allow us to compete – and win – against the rest of the world. Today, trade with Canada and Mexico stands at $1.3 trillion annually and supports 14 million jobs. Canada and Mexico are the biggest export destination for 37 states. Whether big or small, American manufacturers, farmers, and the services providers from across all sectors of our economy have benefited from NAFTA. For instance, from 1993 to 2016, agriculture exports to Canada and Mexico quadrupled from $8.9 billion to $38.1 billion.

While NAFTA has benefited American workers and businesses, the agreement now is over two decades old, and there is a clear opportunity to improve the agreement and modernize its rules to better address our 21st century economy. Enhanced market access, reduced bureaucratic red tape, expanded energy exports, and updated rules on digital trade, intellectual property rights, and regulatory standards – all fully enforceable through binding dispute settlement – will create certainty for American business, new opportunities for more American jobs, and more benefits to consumers.

Mr. President, your economic stewardship has triggered positive momentum that has not been seen in years. The recent historic tax cuts that you signed into law have delivered significant raises, bonuses, and better benefits for workers, as well as new investments at home in equipment and facilities. We can further improve economic opportunities for American consumers, workers, and job creators by remaining in NAFTA and modernizing the agreement.

We look forward to working with you and your Administration to realize our shared goal of a modernized NAFTA that will foster even greater economic success for Americans as we continue to compete and win around the world.

Sincerely,

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

###

Walorski Statement on China Tariffs

Walorski Statement on China Tariffs

MISHAWAKA, Ind. – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today released the following statement after the administration released a preliminary list of Chinese products to be subject to tariffs:

“President Trump is right to take action to address China’s unfair trade practices, in particular their rampant intellectual property theft that hurts our economic growth, stifles innovation, and costs American jobs. However, any action must be targeted and balanced to avoid reversing the economic momentum driven by historic tax cuts and regulatory reforms. I will continue working with the administration to protect Hoosier manufacturers, farmers, and workers.”

BACKGROUND

At a recent House Ways and Means Committee hearing, Congresswoman Walorski pressed U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer on the administration’s response to threats of retaliatory tariffs that could harm American farmers, manufacturers, and other small businesses. She called on the administration to consider the impact retaliatory measures could have on small businesses and family farmers in Indiana.

Walorski has also worked to minimize the harmful impact of the steel and aluminum tariffs that recently took effect. After Walorski led 15 of her Ways and Means colleagues in sending a letter to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross urging retroactive relief for companies that successfully petition for product exclusions from the tariffs, President Trump signed an order ensuring tariffs paid while a product exclusion request is pending will be returned if the exclusion is granted.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

###

Walorski Applauds Trump Decision to Provide Retroactive Tariff Relief for Exclusions

Walorski Applauds Trump Decision to Provide Retroactive Tariff Relief for Exclusions

U.S. Businesses Granted Product Exclusions from Steel and Aluminum Tariffs Will Not Be Forced to Pay Unnecessary Tax

MISHAWAKA, Ind. – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today applauded President Trump’s decision to ensure steel and aluminum tariffs paid by U.S. businesses while a product exclusion request is pending will be returned if the exclusion is granted.

“Narrowing these tariffs and providing flexibility to American businesses is critical to maintaining our nation’s economic momentum, and this is another step in the right direction,” Congresswoman Walorski said. “This commonsense decision will ensure American manufacturers aren’t forced to pay an unnecessary tax on products for which they are granted an exclusion. Now that the tariffs have taken effect, I will be closely monitoring any impact on local manufacturers and continuing to work with the administration to protect Hoosier jobs.”

BACKGROUND

President Trump on Thursday issued proclamations modifying the tariffs on aluminum and steel that took effect Friday. The proclamations ordered that tariff relief for products that cannot be obtained domestically or are vital to national security will be retroactive to when the request was submitted.

Congresswoman Walorski last week led 15 of her Ways and Means colleagues in sending a letter to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross urging retroactive relief for companies that successfully petition for product exclusions from the tariffs. In testimony Thursday before the committee, Secretary Ross said the Commerce Department has made a formal request to U.S. Customs and Border Protection to put tariffs paid while an exclusion request is pending into an escrow account so they can be returned if the exclusion is granted.

Walorski previously sent a letter to President Trump expressing concerns with his tariff proposal and sharing feedback from local manufacturers. She also signed a letter, along with 106 of her House Republican colleagues, urging the president to target unfair trade practices rather than impose blanket tariffs.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

###

House Passes Bill to Rebuild Military, Invest in Infrastructure, Boost Opioid Response

House Passes Bill to Rebuild Military, Invest in Infrastructure, Boost Opioid Response

FY18 Funding Legislation Also Includes Walorski Provision to Reduce Costs and Red Tape for American Manufacturers

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.) today released the following statement after the House passed legislation to rebuild the military, give servicemembers a raise, invest in infrastructure, combat the opioid crisis, and help American manufacturers and farmers:

“After years of neglect, our Armed Forces are finally getting the resources necessary to begin rebuilding, boost military readiness, and defend our nation from any enemy. With this bill, we are delivering on our constitutional obligation to provide for the common defense. And we are giving our troops the tools, training, and support they need – including their biggest pay raise in eight years.

“We are also making key investments in fighting the opioid epidemic, modernizing our nation’s infrastructure, securing our borders, making schools safer, and supporting American manufacturers, farmers, and small businesses. This is a critical step as we continue building on the economic momentum from pro-growth reforms and working toward commonsense solutions that help Hoosier families thrive.”

BACKGROUND

The House passed the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 (H.R. 1625) by a vote of 256 to 167. The bill, which provides funding for the remainder of fiscal year 2018, now heads to the Senate.

National Defense: Supports rebuilding our Armed Forces by providing the largest increase in defense funding in 15 years, including resources to increase troop levels, boost military readiness, improve training, and invest in maintenance and new equipment. It also funds a 2.4 percent pay raise for our servicemembers – their biggest in eight years.

Veterans: Includes record funding for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), including more resources for health care, addiction treatment, and facility improvements.

Opioids: Provides nearly $4 billion to help communities fight the opioid epidemic – the largest federal investment to date – including funding for treatment, prevention, and law enforcement.

Manufacturers: Cuts costs and red tape for American manufacturers, including in the RV industry, with a provision Walorski authored to fix a technical issue in the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) tariff relief program, which is reauthorized for three years.

Farmers: Fixes the Section 199A “grain glitch,” a drafting error in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act to ensure farmers get the same tax benefits when they sell to private companies as they would when selling to co-ops. Walorski recently signed a letter urging congressional leaders to quickly resolve the issue.

Infrastructure: Invests in building a modern infrastructure for the 21st century, including roads, bridges, public transit, airways, railways, waterways, energy, and broadband. Walorski led

Border Security: Boosts border security by funding $2.9 billion in security improvements and technology, including $1.57 billion to begin construction of the border wall.

School Safety: Protects students by implementing key provisions of the STOP School Violence Act, which the House passed last week, and providing more than $2.3 billion in new funding for mental health, training, and school safety programs. The bill also fixes and fully funds the FBI’s National Instant Criminal Background System (NICS) to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous criminals while protecting the Second Amendment rights of law-abiding Americans.

Tax Cuts: Ensures the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has the resources necessary to fully implement the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the historic tax reform law that cut taxes for Americans at all income levels and restored America’s economic competitiveness.

Walorski represents the 2nd Congressional District of Indiana, serving as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

###

Get News & Updates